Manything…

I bet you are wondering what Manything is.. Manything is an app that turns your Iphone,iPad or iPod into a sophisticated monitoring camera with Manything. With live feeds,unlimited recording, motion alerts and more.  

To get started you would need an iPod oe your smartphone and having a Joby Griptight micro stand to hold your iPod or use an old smartphone if you don’t have a iPod.

Connect the iPod to WiFi and power then open the Manything app and register. Select camera then all you do is press the red button to start your camera.

To watch on your phone what is happening at home you get the app Manything then login. Then after you login select viewer and tap on the camera to see the live streaming and motion. You can also view it online at www.manything.com.

Key features :

  • Sound
  • Adjustable sensitivity threshold and motion detection zones
  • Share /download of clips straight from the app
  • Two-way talk button
  • IFTTT integration  (https://manything.com/ifttt.html)

You can catch your pet do the funniest things that you might have tried a million times before , but with Manything app taking video and photos you will get that photo you have been wanting. Like Angel and her famous stand. 

Here’s another one of Angel curious of what is in the box has been caught red handed with the Manything iPod set up to watch her.

I also took it outside to test to see if I could catch Angel and her funny expression when she heard me talking to her from inside. LoL! This was priceless! This new app that you can use and turn into a security camera while you are away to keep an eye on your home and pets is a fantastic idea because we all have an old smartphone or iPod so all you would need is to download the Manything app! I give this 2 paws meaning 5 stars on a rating scale.

You might get some priceless videos or photo that you might not be successful on your regular camera and a peace of mind of you getting alerts of movement in your home. Besides you can also go live on Facebook too. I think this app has just opened another way to help keep us and our pets safe .

If you want more information about Manything follow the link below, but before you go stop by and let me know what you thought about this new product.

Website-https://manything.com/

Facebook-https://www.facebook.com/ManythingInc/

Instagram-https://www.instagram.com/manythingapp/

Twitter –https://twitter.com/ManythingApp

YouTube:

I don’t mind being watched just don’t post it if I have a bad hair day.

See you next time,

Angel’s Eyes -Persian

A Mother’s Day Bouquet to Die For

A Mother’s Day Bouquet to Die For

By Dr. Jeremy Campbell BVSc, MANZCVS (Feline Med) RCVS Advanced Practitioner (Feline Medicine) MRCVS

Mother’s Day is fast approaching and it is the perfect time to celebrate our lovely mothers and all they have done for us with a beautiful bouquet of flowers.

These treats which spell happiness and brownie points from Mum could spell disaster for our feline friends if they choose to celebrate the day unbeknownst to you.

Flowers are always guaranteed to put a smile on mum’s face and the ten favourite flowers to give on her special day according to Interflora UK are; Carnation; Rose; Sunflower; Gerbera Daisy; Tulip; Violet; Orchid; Lily; Freesia and Alstroemeria. Of this list Carnations, Tulips and Lilies are all toxic in some way to cats.  Sometimes we want to give a gift that lasts more than a few days so we think a houseplant would be lovely; Crocuses; Cylamens, Hyacinth or Azaleas…….all toxic.

The big ones to worry about are those beautiful monsters of the Lilium family which includes Easter and Asian or Oriental lilies. These lilies are particularly toxic and are unfortunately present in a huge number in a majority of store-bought and designer bouquets. They are incredibly toxic to our cats causing acute renal failure and potentially death. All parts of the lily are toxic including the pollen, even the water they are sitting in is a source of danger. It doesn’t take much for an inquisitive cat to wander over and brush against these fatal floral fancies. Pollen on the coat, coat groomed, you understand how is goes.

Calla lilies are not the same family as above and while they aren’t fatal but can cause nasty stomach upsets and damage to the mouth – best to avoid.

Not on that list but also popular are Chrysanthemums, Amaryllis and Anthurium spp. and the humble but increasingly present Hydrangea…all toxic.

Toxicity signs vary from the severe organ damage and potential death (lily, crocus and azalea) through to vomiting, diarrhoea, excess salivation, depression, oral damage and inflammation of the skin (the rest).

Despite this list of belligerent blooms there still a huge array of beautiful flowers you can give mum or a loved one, it just pays to be in the know about what can cause harm to the other non-human members of your household.  If you are going to give flowers as a gift, dig a little deeper and find out if there are any furry family members that could become unwitting victims of a flower disaster.

A little bit of extra time spent organising the gift will be worth it when an incredibly thoughtful cat-safe bouquet arrives and remains proudly on display as opposed to fatal floristry being hastily whisked away into a cupboard out of harm’s way or worse removed to the bin.

Something that is often forgotten in that moment of intense excitement and the unwrapping is the numerous small strings and ties that are used to hold your bouquet together. These, particularly for a kitten or younger cat constitute the perfect toy, they are also the perfect size to swallow and potentially become stuck in the intestines– please remember to clear away all your wrapping and push everything deep into the bin…a small tie hanging over the edge is way too much temptation to resist and this will happily be ‘attacked’ and eaten.

For more information on these and toxic plants in general go to The International Cat Care website here. International Cat Care also have an active campaign calling for greater awareness of the potential toxic effects of lilies and clearer labelling for consumers here. Please spread the word.

If you think your kitten or cat has been exposed to a potential toxic flower or plant, even if you are unsure please call your veterinary clinic immediately.

Dr. Jeremy Campbell is founder of The London Cat Clinic, a feline only veterinary practice opening in May 2017. In 2015 he became a Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons Advanced Practitioner in Feline Medicine, 1 of only 15 people to currently hold that qualification in the United Kingdom.

5 Problems Only People with Multiple Cats Will Understand

  1. You’ll never know who had diarrhea in the litter box.
  2. You never know who shat out a red string. Or a gold thread. Or a rubber band (or two).
  3. You don’t know who left the surprise pile of puke in the kitchen. Or the hallway. Or in the precise place you step when you get out of bed in the morning.
  4. You’re not sure who ate all the dry food. Or the wet food.
  5. You’re not sure who left those scratches on the fake leather ottoman. Or the new leather chair.

The bottom line is there is a shitload of uncertainty and mystery. Unless you install hidden cameras all over your house and watch them, like a psycho stalker (no judgement), these animals co-exist with us, often active when we’re asleep and we have to find the zen with this lack of control and knowledge. I imagine the TV reality family, The Duggers, with their 19 children, had to also acquiesce to this kind of lack of ungovernability.

On the flip side, multiple furballs have definitely translated to multiple bliss. Watching the interaction between kitties is equal to watching an older sibling hold the baby’s hand. There are moments of a feline fairytale, which cuddling cats, echoing purr sessions, and lick-fests, which I call kiss-fests. The love you get from one cat is exponentially more from two cats – or three.

Additionally, cats have a biological need to roughhouse, scratch and bite (LOVINGLY). When cats have sister/brother/roommate cats, they have buddies with whom they can get their aggression out. I recommend getting cats in pairs because innately they are animals who are most content with their pride. They feel happier, safer and more social with cats around them.

About the author:

Galina Nemirovsky is a freelance writer and essayist, transcribing the human condition using examples from her life. She contributes regularly to The Huffington Post on life, love, relationships, clowns, cats, and catastrophes. Galina dedicated 2016 to her 365 Project: Life Clubs where she wrote an autobiographical essay a day on her blog: www.HeartsEverywhere.com

Follow her on Twitter: https://twitter.com/heartseverywher and Instagram, where she is working on this year’s “365 Project: Documenting Life 2017”: https://www.instagram.com/galinanemirovsky/