Guest Star: Muse

It’s a blessed day on Halcyon Pond,  for awareness of gifts and unexpected moments.

As I passed the doors to our deck this morning, I saw a furry flash. I thought it was a raccoon, but it was more graceful than that. When I stepped outside I was met by a timid but eager kitten. So small and skinny I can hold her in one hand. In spite of being obviously abandoned, she is one of the most affectionate cats I’ve met. A nuzzler, she buries her head in the crook of my elbow, the nape of my neck.

She reminds me of a cat I met in the plaza of the Topkapi palace in Istanbul. There are cats everywhere in Turkey, who are not strays, but rather belong to the community. They are taken care of, but not owned by anyone, which suits a cat perfectly. Turkish cats have a distinctive look, dark with russet patches—a rich, warm coat—and sparkling golden eyes. This beautiful little cat came up to me in the plaza, open and friendly. I carried her with me for hours, sometimes in my bag, until finally we had to part. This morning it is as if that cat has finally found me again, with the same dark and russet coat, and the same open demeanor, running toward me as if toward an old friend.

I look in her eyes and I sense she is an old soul. I wonder, who are her ancestors? Did the women of the Topkapi palace play with her great great great grandmother? Does she know their secrets? Can she tell of palace intrigue, of eunuchs and murderous plots?

I pull myself away from exotic daydreams. I had many plans for today—many objectives. But she has followed me everywhere since we met, making it difficult to accomplish anything. I think, “I must move on, stay on course!”. But how often does a moment like this happen? How often does a gift just appear, reminding us of the small beauties of life? (Unfortunately, probably more often than we know because we resist being derailed.)

So, I have decided to give myself over to this moment. To feel this small cat’s warmth, feel her trust, listen to her purr and remember the small gifts of life.

A cat’s purr. Serenity given voice.

Oh, and she’s just told me her name. It’s Muse. Which is great, not just because of the pun, but also because there’s always the chance that, when I call her, the other one–The Muse–might just show up.

Don’t you love it when
Cats purr
SO hard
It takes over
Their whole body
One purr stumbles
Over the next
Hyper-purr
Hypurr
High-Purr

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31 thoughts on “Guest Star: Muse

  1. She is a beauty: We got our cat, Ming, who was abandoned at about seven months. We never heard a pure from him until about four years later. He still doesn’t purr routinely. Mostly when he’s right in or close to our face. He dollows my wife around like a puppy. Me, hecomes to when she’s. outsidewoeking in the yard and will want to lay beside me on the sofa to be petted for re-assurance.

    1. Oh my goodness! I could never give her up. She has a very happy home here and would be lost without Count Vronsky (our rescue Russian Blue) to harass.

  2. What a beautiful soul. She must have known she would be loved and looked after in your arms and your heart. All cats remind us of the simple things but sometimes there are rare moments when the souls of 2 special beings meet.

  3. I have the same kind of cat – have never seen one before with this woolly fur, and she’s so mottled you can hardly see her face.. mine is called Shadow. Very sweet disposition. 🙂

      1. Mine was a 12 year old rescue from the shelter. No one was adopting her due to litterbox issues listed on her rap sheet but it had to be a territorial issue because she’s been the perfect cat.

          1. Me too. I think she’d been passed from family to kid’s house and when they brought her back there was another cat. It was a no-kill shelter, but she’d been there for 3 months. She loves anything that’s done for her. 🙂

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